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Relaxed and Ready to Go!

May212013
Every morning at work I listen to Robin Sharma, a Canadian Leadership expert, and in one of his V-logs he talks about entrepreneurs needing to take a holiday every 6 weeks to re-focus and escape from the day-to-day operations. Well, I seem to do it every 6 months (instead of weeks)...but after a very relaxing 3 day weekend with the family at the cottage, a few nice long morning jogs, long walks with Rusty and some great alone time on the dock with my son fishing...

Every morning at work I listen to Robin Sharma, a Canadian Leadership expert, and in one of his V-logs he talks about entrepreneurs needing to take a holiday every 6 weeks to re-focus and escape from the day-to-day operations. Well, I seem to do it every 6 months (instead of weeks)...but after a very relaxing 3 day weekend with the family at the cottage, a few nice long morning jogs, long walks with Rusty and some great alone time on the dock with my son fishing...I was finally able to shut it off for 48 over hours ("it" being work and the details that run through your mind incessantly on a daily basis) and I think Robin's right! Actually, I know he's right. Not only did I not think about work and the numerous tasks waiting for me back at the office this morning, but I hadn't checked my iPhone (other than to take some photos and check the scores of the baseball and hockey games) for almost 2 days. It wasn't until I crossed the Burlington Skyway on our return home that I started to re-focus on DANIMA. But instead of that "oh man, I wish I had one more day on this great long weekend", I was ready to go...excited about the week ahead! Ready to get to the office at 6 am to get my "short" work week under-way and ready to act on some new ideas that came from either the lake-gazing, the relaxing jogs through Tweed or in one of the late night fireside moments of prolonged silence when you stare into the heart of the fire and lose yourself until someone says "hey, you ready for another drink"!

I guess the one thing that makes the above ramblings possible is the great team and work environment here at DANIMA. Not only do we have the most efficient and talented staff that we've ever had under the DANIMA roof, but we have a great "corporate" culture that makes you want to come to work. Trust me, that hasn't always been the case. So, when Mr. Sharma talks about needing that time to escape to allow your mind to re-focus and come up with new, innovative ideas for your business, it can stop there, as just ideas, unless you have a great team to execute those ideas. Nick and I have that team - the DANIMALS (http://www.danima.com/the_danimals/index/). Albeit, smaller than it's ever been, it's a lean, mean, creative team that has helped turn DANIMA back around after one of our roughest periods in 15 years!

So, it's back to work but not, as they say, "back to the grind". A great long weekend that was just long enough to relax, rejuvenate and refocus myself to continue this exciting adventure we call DANIMA. I hope it did the same for you and you are ready to take on the challenges of a new work week with a new energy and enthusiasm! We'll see some of you on Facebook LinkedIn, Twitter, Klout, Pinterest, via email, talk on the phone or see you in a meeting...either way, have a great week and as Southside says "reach up and touch the sky"!

Until next time...enjoy every sandwich!

Posted by: DANIMA Dave

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